Colorado’s Felony Theft Penalties 2023: What You Need to Know

 

In the state of Colorado, felony theft is a serious offense that carries significant penalties and consequences. If you are facing charges of felony theft, it is important to understand the potential legal implications and what you may be up against.

Felony theft refers to the act of unlawfully taking someone else’s property with the intent to permanently deprive them of it. This can include a wide range of items, such as money, electronics, or even a vehicle. The severity of the offense is determined by the value of the stolen property.

 Understanding Felony Theft in Colorado

To be charged with felony theft in Colorado, the value of the stolen property must exceed a certain threshold. Currently, the threshold is set at $2,000. If the value of the stolen property is below this amount, it may be considered a misdemeanor offense instead.

The Definition of Felony Theft

Felony theft is classified as a crime against property. It involves intentionally taking someone else’s property without their permission and with the intent to permanently deprive them of it. This can include acts such as shoplifting, burglary, or embezzlement.

Classifications of Felony Theft in Colorado

Felony theft in Colorado is classified into different levels based on the value of the stolen property. These levels range from Class 6 felony theft for property valued between $2,000 and $5,000, to Class 2 felony theft for property valued at $1 million or more.

Penalties for Felony Theft in Colorado

The penalties for felony theft in Colorado can vary depending on the classification of the offense. Generally, they can include imprisonment, fines, and restitution to the victim. The length of imprisonment and the amount of fines can increase with the severity of the offense.

Potential Jail Time for Felony Theft

The potential jail time for felony theft in Colorado can range from one year for a Class 6 felony to 24 years for a Class 2 felony. The specific length of imprisonment will depend on the circumstances of the case and any prior criminal history.

Fines and Restitution for Felony Theft

In addition to imprisonment, individuals convicted of felony theft may also face fines. The amount of fines can vary depending on the classification of the offense. Additionally, the court may order the offender to pay restitution to the victim to compensate for any financial losses incurred.

Understanding Felony Theft in Colorado

Felony theft is a serious offense in the state of Colorado, and it is important to understand its implications. In simple terms, felony theft refers to the act of unlawfully taking someone else’s property with the intent to permanently deprive them of it. This can include stealing items from a store, embezzling funds from an employer, or even taking someone’s personal belongings without their permission.

To be charged with felony theft in Colorado, the value of the stolen property must exceed a certain threshold. The specific threshold amount can vary depending on the circumstances, but generally, it is set at $2,000 or more. If the value of the stolen property is below this threshold, the offense may be considered a misdemeanor rather than a felony.

It is important to note that the value of the stolen property is determined by its fair market value at the time of the theft. This means that even if an item was purchased at a discounted price or was of low monetary value, its fair market value will be considered when determining the charges.

Felony theft in Colorado is classified into different levels based on the value of the stolen property. These levels range from Class 6 felony theft for property valued between $2,000 and $5,000, to Class 2 felony theft for property valued at $1 million or more. The severity of the charges increases as the value of the stolen property increases.

The penalties for felony theft in Colorado can include both jail time and fines. The length of the potential jail sentence depends on the level of the offense and can range from one year for a Class 6 felony to 24 years for a Class 2 felony. Fines can also vary, with higher amounts imposed for higher-level offenses.

In addition to jail time and fines, individuals convicted of felony theft may also be required to pay restitution to the victim. Restitution is a form of compensation that aims to reimburse the victim for their losses resulting from the theft.

It is important to understand that the consequences of felony theft in Colorado extend beyond just jail time and fines. A conviction can have long-lasting effects on a person’s personal and professional life, including difficulty finding employment and housing, loss of certain rights, and damage to their reputation.

If you are facing charges of felony theft in Colorado, it is crucial to seek legal representation to understand your rights and options. An experienced attorney can help build a strong defense and navigate the legal process to achieve the best

The Definition of Felony Theft


Felony theft is a serious offense in the state of Colorado, and it is important to understand its definition. In simple terms, felony theft occurs when someone unlawfully takes another person’s property with the intent to permanently deprive them of it.

To be considered felony theft, the value of the stolen property must exceed a certain threshold. In Colorado, this threshold is $2,000. If the value of the stolen property is below this amount, it may be considered a misdemeanor theft instead.

It is also worth noting that the value of the stolen property is determined by its fair market value at the time of the theft. This means that even if the item is worth more than $2,000 when it was purchased, if its value has significantly depreciated at the time of the theft, it may not meet the threshold for felony theft.

Felony theft can involve various types of property, including money, goods, or services. It can occur through various means, such as shoplifting, embezzlement, or fraud. The key factor is that the act is done without the owner’s consent and with the intention of permanently keeping the property.

It is important to understand that intent plays a crucial role in determining whether an act constitutes felony theft. If someone takes another person’s property without intending to permanently deprive them of it, it may not be considered felony theft. However, this does not mean that the act is legal or without consequences. It may still be considered a lesser offense, such as misdemeanor theft or trespassing.

In conclusion, felony theft in Colorado is the unlawful taking of another person’s property with the intent to permanently deprive them of it, where the value of the stolen property exceeds $2,000. It can involve various types of property and can occur through different means. Understanding the definition of felony theft is essential for individuals to be aware of the potential legal consequences they may face if they engage in such activities.

 Classifications of Felony Theft in Colorado


Felony theft in Colorado is classified into different categories based on the value of the stolen property. The severity of the offense and the potential penalties vary depending on the classification. Here are the different classifications of felony theft in Colorado:

1. Class 6 Felony Theft: This classification applies when the value of the stolen property is between $2,000 and $5,000. Class 6 felony theft is the least severe category of felony theft in Colorado. If convicted, the offender may face imprisonment for up to 18 months and fines ranging from $1,000 to $100,000.

2. Class 5 Felony Theft: When the value of the stolen property is between $5,000 and $20,000, the offense is classified as a Class 5 felony theft. The penalties for this category include imprisonment for up to three years and fines ranging from $1,000 to $100,000.

3. Class 4 Felony Theft: If the value of the stolen property is between $20,000 and $100,000, the offense is considered a Class 4 felony theft. Conviction for this category can result in imprisonment for up to six years and fines ranging from $2,000 to $500,000.

4. Class 3 Felony Theft: When the value of the stolen property is between $100,000 and $1 million, the offense is classified as a Class 3 felony theft. The penalties for this category include imprisonment for up to 12 years and fines ranging from $3,000 to $750,000.

5. Class 2 Felony Theft: This is the most severe category of felony theft in Colorado. It applies when the value of the stolen property exceeds $1 million. Conviction for Class 2 felony theft can result in imprisonment for up to 24 years and fines ranging from $5,000 to $1 million.

It is important to note that these penalties are subject to change and may vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case and the offender’s criminal history. Additionally, the court may also order restitution, requiring the offender to compensate the victim for any financial losses resulting from the theft.

Understanding the classifications of felony theft in Colorado is crucial for individuals facing charges or seeking information about the potential consequences. It is advisable to consult with a legal professional who can provide guidance and assistance in navigating the legal process.

Penalties for Felony Theft in Colorado

Felony theft in Colorado carries serious penalties that can have a significant impact on your life. The severity of the penalties depends on the value of the stolen property and other factors. Let’s take a closer look at the potential consequences you may face if convicted of felony theft in Colorado.

1. Value of Stolen Property: The penalties for felony theft are determined based on the value of the stolen property. In Colorado, theft is considered a felony if the value of the stolen property exceeds $2,000. If the value is less than $2,000, it is typically charged as a misdemeanor.

2. Classifications of Felony Theft: Felony theft in Colorado is classified into different levels based on the value of the stolen property. The higher the value, the more severe the penalties. The classifications include:

a. Class 6 Felony: If the value of the stolen property is between $2,000 and $5,000, it is considered a Class 6 felony. The penalties for this level of felony theft can include imprisonment for up to 18 months and fines ranging from $1,000 to $100,000.

b. Class 5 Felony: If the value of the stolen property is between $5,000 and $20,000, it is considered a Class 5 felony. The penalties for this level of felony theft can include imprisonment for up to three years and fines ranging from $1,000 to $100,000.

c. Class 4 Felony: If the value of the stolen property is between $20,000 and $100,000, it is considered a Class 4 felony. The penalties for this level of felony theft can include imprisonment for up to six years and fines ranging from $2,000 to $500,000.

d. Class 3 Felony: If the value of the stolen property is $100,000 or more, it is considered a Class 3 felony. The penalties for this level of felony theft can include imprisonment for up to 12 years and fines ranging from $3,000 to $750,000.

3. Aggravating Factors: In some cases, certain aggravating factors can increase the severity of the penalties. These factors may include prior convictions, the use of weapons during the theft, or theft from a vulnerable person. If any aggravating factors are present, the penalties can be enhanced.

 Potential Jail Time for Felony Theft

When it comes to felony theft in Colorado, the potential jail time can vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case. The severity of the offense and the value of the stolen property are factors that can influence the length of the sentence.

In general, felony theft is classified into different levels based on the value of the stolen property. These levels range from Class 6 felony theft to Class 2 felony theft, with Class 2 being the most serious.

For Class 6 felony theft, which involves property valued between $2,000 and $5,000, the potential jail time can be up to 18 months. This means that if convicted, the offender may face a sentence of up to 18 months in a state correctional facility.

As the value of the stolen property increases, so does the potential jail time. For example, for Class 5 felony theft, which involves property valued between $5,000 and $20,000, the potential jail time can be up to three years. Class 4 felony theft, which involves property valued between $20,000 and $100,000, can result in a sentence of up to six years in prison.

For the most serious cases of felony theft, such as Class 2 felony theft, which involves property valued at $1 million or more, the potential jail time can be up to 24 years. These cases are considered extremely severe and can result in lengthy prison sentences.

It’s important to note that these potential jail times are just guidelines and can be influenced by various factors, such as the defendant’s criminal history and the presence of any aggravating or mitigating circumstances.

In addition to jail time, individuals convicted of felony theft in Colorado may also face other legal consequences, such as fines and restitution. These financial penalties can be substantial and are intended to compensate the victim for their losses.

Overall, felony theft in Colorado carries significant potential jail time, with the severity of the offense and the value of the stolen property playing a crucial role in determining the length of the sentence. It is essential to consult with a legal professional if you are facing felony theft charges to understand the specific penalties and potential defenses available to you.

Fines and Restitution for Felony Theft

When it comes to felony theft in Colorado, the penalties go beyond just potential jail time. Offenders can also face significant fines and restitution payments. Let’s take a closer look at what these consequences entail.

Fines are monetary penalties imposed by the court as a punishment for committing a crime. In Colorado, the amount of the fine for felony theft can vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case. Factors such as the value of the stolen property and the defendant’s criminal history can influence the fine amount.

The court takes into consideration the seriousness of the offense and the defendant’s ability to pay when determining the fine. The purpose of imposing fines is to deter individuals from engaging in criminal behavior and to provide some form of financial compensation to the victim.

In addition to fines, individuals convicted of felony theft may also be required to pay restitution. Restitution is a form of compensation that is meant to reimburse the victim for any financial losses they suffered as a result of the theft. This can include the value of the stolen property, any damages caused, and even expenses incurred during the investigation or prosecution of the case.

The court will assess the amount of restitution based on the evidence presented and the victim’s documented losses. It is important to note that restitution payments are separate from fines and are specifically intended to compensate the victim.

Failure to pay fines and restitution can have serious consequences. The court may impose additional penalties, such as extending the probation period or even ordering a prison sentence. It is crucial for individuals facing felony theft charges to understand the financial obligations they may face and to work with their legal representation to develop a plan for meeting these obligations.

In conclusion, felony theft in Colorado can result in not only potential jail time but also significant fines and restitution payments. The court takes into account various factors when determining the amount of fines and restitution, and failure to pay these obligations can lead to further legal consequences. It is important for individuals facing these charges to seek legal advice and understand their financial responsibilities to ensure the best possible outcome for their case.

Other Legal Consequences of Felony Theft


When it comes to felony theft in Colorado, the legal consequences extend beyond just potential jail time and fines. If you are convicted of felony theft, there are several other repercussions that you should be aware of.

One significant consequence is the impact on your criminal record. A felony theft conviction will remain on your record permanently, which can have long-lasting effects on various aspects of your life. Having a felony on your record can make it challenging to find employment, as many employers conduct background checks and may be hesitant to hire someone with a theft conviction. It can also affect your ability to secure housing, loans, and even impact your personal relationships.

Additionally, a felony theft conviction can result in the loss of certain civil rights. In Colorado, individuals convicted of a felony offense lose their right to vote while incarcerated. However, once you have completed your sentence, including any probation or parole, your voting rights are typically restored. It’s important to note that this may vary depending on the specific circumstances of your case, so consulting with a legal professional is advisable.

Another potential consequence of felony theft is the requirement to pay restitution. Restitution is a form of compensation that the court may order you to pay to the victim(s) of the theft. This is meant to reimburse them for any financial losses they suffered as a result of the crime. The amount of restitution can vary depending on the value of the stolen property or the financial harm caused. Failure to comply with a restitution order can lead to further legal trouble, including potential additional penalties.

Lastly, a felony theft conviction can impact your future criminal charges and sentencing. If you have a prior felony on your record, subsequent offenses may result in more severe penalties. This is known as the “three strikes” law, where individuals with multiple felony convictions face enhanced punishment.

In conclusion, felony theft in Colorado carries not only potential jail time and fines but also other significant legal consequences. These can include the long-term impact on your criminal record, loss of certain civil rights, the requirement to pay restitution, and the potential for enhanced penalties for future offenses. It is crucial to understand these consequences and seek legal guidance if you are facing felony theft charges.

Defenses for Felony Theft Charges


When facing felony theft charges in Colorado, it is crucial to understand that there are potential defenses that can be used to challenge the accusations. These defenses aim to cast doubt on the prosecution’s case and potentially lead to a reduction in charges or even a dismissal of the case. Here are some common defenses that can be employed:

1. Lack of Intent: One possible defense is to argue that there was no intent to commit theft. This defense asserts that the accused did not have the intention to permanently deprive the owner of their property. For example, if someone mistakenly took an item believing it was theirs, they may argue that there was no intent to steal.

2. Mistaken Identity: Another defense strategy is to claim mistaken identity. This defense asserts that the accused was not the person who committed the theft. It may involve presenting evidence such as alibis, surveillance footage, or witness testimonies to prove that the accused was not present at the scene of the crime.

3. Consent: If the accused had the owner’s consent to take the property, it can be a valid defense. This defense may involve presenting evidence such as written agreements, verbal statements, or witnesses who can testify to the owner’s permission.

4. Lack of Evidence: Challenging the evidence presented by the prosecution is another defense strategy. This may involve questioning the credibility of witnesses, challenging the chain of custody of the alleged stolen property, or highlighting any inconsistencies or gaps in the prosecution’s case.

5. Entrapment: In some cases, the defense may argue that the accused was induced or coerced by law enforcement to commit the theft. Entrapment occurs when law enforcement officers persuade or pressure individuals into committing a crime they would not have otherwise committed.

It is important to note that the success of these defenses will depend on the specific circumstances of each case and the strength of the evidence presented. Consulting with an experienced criminal defense attorney is crucial to determine the most appropriate defense strategy and navigate the legal process effectively.

In conclusion, when facing felony theft charges in Colorado, it is essential to understand the available defenses. Lack of intent, mistaken identity, consent, lack of evidence, and entrapment are some common defenses that can be used to challenge the accusations. Consulting with a knowledgeable attorney is crucial to build a strong defense and protect one’s rights in the legal process.

Defenses for Felony Theft Charges

When facing felony theft charges in Colorado, it is crucial to understand that there are potential defenses that can be used to challenge the accusations. These defenses aim to cast doubt on the prosecution’s case and can potentially lead to a reduction in charges or even a dismissal of the case. Here are some common defenses that can be used in felony theft cases:

1. Lack of Intent: One possible defense is to argue that there was no intent to commit theft. This defense asserts that the accused did not have the intention to permanently deprive the owner of their property. For example, if someone mistakenly took an item believing it was theirs, it may be argued that there was no intent to steal.

2. Mistaken Identity: Another defense is to claim mistaken identity. This defense asserts that the accused was not the person who committed the theft. It may involve presenting evidence such as alibis, surveillance footage, or witness testimonies to prove that the accused was not present at the scene of the crime.

3. Consent: If the owner of the property gave consent for the accused to take the item, it can be argued that there was no theft. This defense may require providing evidence such as written agreements, witness statements, or recorded conversations to prove that consent was given.

4. Lack of Evidence: Challenging the evidence presented by the prosecution is another defense strategy. This may involve questioning the reliability of witnesses, the accuracy of surveillance footage, or the handling of the evidence. If the prosecution fails to provide sufficient evidence to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, the charges may be dismissed.

5. Entrapment: In some cases, the defense of entrapment may be applicable. This defense asserts that the accused was induced or coerced by law enforcement to commit the theft. It requires proving that the idea and opportunity to commit the crime originated from law enforcement rather than the accused.

It is important to note that each case is unique, and the viability of these defenses will depend on the specific circumstances. Consulting with an experienced criminal defense attorney is crucial to determine the best defense strategy for your particular case.

Remember, this information is provided for general informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice. If you are facing felony theft charges in Colorado, it is recommended to seek professional legal counsel to understand your rights and options.